A quick guide to constructing marketing emails

Writing great marketing emails for your marketing campaign takes a certain amount of effort. The prose should be easy to read quickly, and the headlines should grab everyone’s attention. Additionally, people should be able to scan it quickly. Most people don’t have time to read an entire email they may receive every few days. For B2B marketing, the focus should be on getting the benefits about the product into an email with as few words as possible.

Email marketing pays off. According to Kristina Knight, writing in Biz Report, marketing emails generates returns of about 119 percent. However, there are still some challenges that everyone involved in the marketing industry faces – particularly with Internet marketing methods. One issue is simply refusing to analyze audience behavior, looking at what someone is viewing on the website before sending out an email. The latest marketing software can actually record what someone clicks on, both inside an email and on a website, and it can also link the email data to the website data, so the two pools of information can be tied back to the same person. This means that the possibility for customizing emails for everyone who reads a website is very strong. This must be considered when it comes to crafting the email approach.

The basic online marketing system for emails has become a matter of sending the right letter to the correct person. In view of this, people who chose not to make customized emails are taking a very bad approach to a problem that has become much more focused on “spear fishing” versus “using a net.” When someone hunts with a spear, one is using the Internet keywords that would most attract the right kind of customer, and then targeting him or her with specific information about the product on a Web page. Next, when the person makes contact via phone or email, the following phase of marketing kicks in, and the call operator or the email is giving the possible client very particular data that he or she wants to know. This is about narrowing the scope of information to exactly what someone needs, rather than expanding the scope so every possible client knows a little bit about many different aspects.

Shaping the headline

With this in mind, the headline becomes a crucial part of the email campaign. In fact, Curt Keller of MarketingProfs says that people should actually spend as much time writing the headline as they do writing the rest of the email. He calls it the 50/50 rule. A fantastic subject line is an even more condensed version of the pitch inside the email, so obviously it won’t come easily or quickly. It has to be carefully sculpted and molded to sell without appearing to do so.

As such, the headline should not use any words that would trigger a spam filter, nor should the words be in capital letters. People want something sophisticated and elegant. Think of it as an extension of your brand. If your company manufactures machines for a very particular industry, you want your customers to know that you are good at what you do. A badly worded headline suggests poor craftsmanship for the product you are trying to sell.Grammar should be tight and neat. Don’t do anything you think is possibly incorrect without checking first. You want your headline to have perfect punctuation and spelling. Keller cited the example of NASA, which forgot to include a hyphen in the code for a rocket, which caused the Mariner I to implode. Your headline is effectively the rocket driving your customers to open your email and read it. If they see you’ve misspelled a word, they might just delete it instead. Proof reading is a major part of the email-writing process. Imagine that you are writing a letter to a potential employer. You want the same level of dedication to detail and authoritative grammar usage. The worst mistake would be to write beautiful prose that has a very obvious typo that was missed.

Grammar should be tight and neat. Don’t do anything you think is possibly incorrect without checking first. You want your headline to have perfect punctuation and spelling. Keller cited the example of NASA, which forgot to include a hyphen in the code for a rocket, which caused the Mariner I to implode. Your headline is effectively the rocket driving your customers to open your email and read it. If they see you’ve misspelled a word, they might just delete it instead. Proof reading is a major part of the email-writing process. Imagine that you are writing a letter to a potential employer. You want the same level of dedication to detail and authoritative grammar usage. The worst mistake would be to write beautiful prose that has a very obvious typo that was missed.

Getting people to read the email

Rosalyn Lemieux, writing in Business 2 Community, explained that when people see an email, the first thing they check is who sent it. If they don’t recognize the sender, the email will likely go into the trash. Therefore, it’s crucial to tie your branding into the name that goes with the email. Don’t surprise or confuse people on this very simple aspect. Just use your company’s name. Additionally, remember that people probably will only read about your product if they’ve given you their email themselves to be signed into a mailing list, so make sure not to buy a list of emails and send it out to everyone because it won’t result in a major sales expansion. This is especially true if your clients are in niche industries.

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